Evan Handler: interview with “Charlie Runkle”


THE ACTOR TALKS ABOUT HIMSELF AND HIS MOST FAMOUS ROLE IN TV SHOWS

evan handlerKind and bright man, Evan Handler is a person who speaks freely about his job, his life and his future wills. I personally met him in Los Angeles one year ago, but just few weeks ago I asked him to answer some questions. About what? Read and you’re gonna discover.

1. You were one of the most recognizable face of Sex and the City, starting from here, you have now a cult role in another kinda sex and the city tv show, Californication, shooted in Los Angeles. How much do you care about your character Charlie Runkle? Do you agree with “him”?

I’ve loved being Charlie Runkle. Whenever I get to play a role that so many people identify with it’s an honor, a pleasure, and a lot of fun. People shout out to me from cars on the freeway, across football fields, wherever. I think the character is particularly approachable to people because, while he’s living a rather extreme existence, he’s wresting with the same kinds of issues of desire vs. access, confidence vs. insecurity, success vs. failure that everyone does.

2. How’s your relationship on set with your colleague David Duchovny aka Hank Moody? Do you think the feeling between you two could be the same even in real life?

David and I have a great relationship that started right upon our first meeting. I know I respect his intellect and his abilities, and I like to believe he feels the same way. Most important, though, is that we make each other laugh. We’re going to begin filming season seven (!) in just a few days, and we still like to watch each other work, because we still get surprised laughs out of each other.

3. Californication has been renewed, do you think the show could have a huge influence on the young generation of film artists?

I think Californication has definitely had its impact on the evolution of sexual and relationship honesty in television. I think there’s an arc that runs from “Sex and the City,” through “Californication,” to “Louie,” (with Louis CK), to “Girls,” even though they’re all very different shows. But I think some of the boundary pushing in each helped allow things that followed in the next. Personally, it’s a kind of television I’m enthusiastic about.

4. In Italy we are moving forward through the new digital innovations, a step behind the States, but now the Huff Post has his great audience. How is important to promote the talent using these networks?

I’m not the most digitally sophisticated person, but I do know that’s where huge audience segments are not only getting their information, but consuming their entertainment. I just worked for two years to regain the rights to the two books I’ve published (Time On Fire: My Comedy of Terrors, and It’s Only Temporary: The Good News and the Bad News of Being Alive), that were taken out of print by their publishers, so I could reissue them as ebooks throughout the world. It’s the most direct content-provider-to-content-consumer channel. Now, anytime of day or night, or anywhere in the world, anyone’s who’s curious about me can click and download my books. I think most of the world still doesn’t know they’re there, but I like knowing they’re available for those who do discover them.

5. The Italian-american connection is getting pretty strong in the US soil, do you think it needs a support to create a solid partnership in the modern film industry?

Here a lot of the news is about how many Australians and Brits are working in television and film this year. Personally, I have worked with a West German filmmaker on an independent film in New York, and have worked in Australia on a TV film project. I think talent is talent, and I like to work with anyone whose work intrigues me. I don’t get annoyed by American companies hiring Australians and Brits, and I hope to come to work in Italy soon (my citizenship approval is overdue, he has an italian wife a.n.). I try to maintain contact with the Italian Consul Generals here in Los Angeles I’ve been lucky enough to get to know, and love having the chance to meet the filmmakers, actors, directors, and producers who come to the Los Angeles events. I think mutually directed flows of creativity and ideas is the ultimate goal, and the ultimate pleasure.

6. What about your future projects, after Runkle, do you have any other important role coming?

I have no acting projects lined up at the moment. There are plays written by old friends I’d like to get produced in high quality ways, and there is a screenplay adaptation of my first book, “Time On Fire,” that I’d like to succeed in getting funded and made. These are things I will continue to pursue through this seasons filming, and beyond.

Photos by Matt Sayles

Check his website: EvanHandler.com

THE ACTOR FROM CALIFORNICATION TALKS ABOUT HIMSELF AND HIS MOST FAMOUS ROLE IN TV SHOWS 

Kind and bright man, Evan Handler is a person who speaks freely about his job, his life and his future wills. I personally met him in Los Angeles one year ago, but just few weeks ago I asked him to answer some questions. About what? Read and you’re gonna discover. 

1. You were one of the most recognizable face of Sex and the City, starting from here, you have now a cult role in another kinda sex and the city tv show, Californication, shooted in Los Angeles. How much do you care about your character Charlie Runkle? Do you agree with “him”?

I’ve loved being Charlie Runkle. Whenever I get to play a role that so many people identify with it’s an honor, a pleasure, and a lot of fun. People shout out to me from cars on the freeway, across football fields, wherever. I think the character is particularly approachable to people because, while he’s living a rather extreme existence, he’s wresting with the same kinds of issues of desire vs. access, confidence vs. insecurity, success vs. failure that everyone does.

2. How’s your relationship on set with your colleague David Duchovny aka Hank Moody? Do you think the feeling between you two could be the same even in real life?

David and I have a great relationship that started right upon our first meeting. I know I respect his intellect and his abilities, and I like to believe he feels the same way. Most important, though, is that we make each other laugh. We’re going to begin filming season seven (!) in just a few days, and we still like to watch each other work, because we still get surprised laughs out of each other.

3. Californication has been renewed, do you think the show could have a huge influence on the young generation of film artists?

I think Californication has definitely had its impact on the evolution of sexual and relationship honesty in television. I think there’s an arc that runs from “Sex and the City,” through “Californication,” to “Louie,” (with Louis CK), to “Girls,” even though they’re all very different shows. But I think some of the boundary pushing in each helped allow things that followed in the next. Personally, it’s a kind of television I’m enthusiastic about.

4. In Italy we are moving forward through the new digital innovations, a step behind the States, but now the Huff Post has his great audience. How is important to promote the talent using these networks?

I’m not the most digitally sophisticated person, but I do know that’s where huge audience segments are not only getting their information, but consuming their entertainment. I just worked for two years to regain the rights to the two books I’ve published (Time On Fire: My Comedy of Terrors, and It’s Only Temporary: The Good News and the Bad News of Being Alive), that were taken out of print by their publishers, so I could reissue them as ebooks throughout the world. It’s the most direct content-provider-to-content-consumer channel. Now, anytime of day or night, or anywhere in the world, anyone’s who’s curious about me can click and download my books. I think most of the world still doesn’t know they’re there, but I like knowing they’re available for those who do discover them.

5. The Italian-american connection is getting pretty strong in the US soil, do you think it needs a support to create a solid partnership in the modern film industry?

Here a lot of the news is about how many Australians and Brits are working in television and film this year. Personally, I have worked with a West German filmmaker on an independent film in New York, and have worked in Australia on a TV film project. I think talent is talent, and I like to work with anyone whose work intrigues me. I don’t get annoyed by American companies hiring Australians and Brits, and I hope to come to work in Italy soon (my citizenship approval is overdue, he has an italian wife a.n.). I try to maintain contact with the Italian Consul Generals here in Los Angeles I’ve been lucky enough to get to know, and love having the chance to meet the filmmakers, actors, directors, and producers who come to the Los Angeles events. I think mutually directed flows of creativity and ideas is the ultimate goal, and the ultimate pleasure.

6. What about your future projects, after Runkle, do you have any other important role coming?

I have no acting projects lined up at the moment. There are plays written by old friends I’d like to get produced in high quality ways, and there is a screenplay adaptation of my first book, “Time On Fire,” that I’d like to succeed in getting funded and made. These are things I will continue to pursue through this seasons filming, and beyond. 

Photos by Matt Sayles 

Check his website: EvanHandler.com

 

About Simone Bracci 277 Articoli
Alla ricerca estrema dell'originalità, quel talento nascosto che il cinema porta a galla con classe ed eleganza d'autore.
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